Blog

14 Apr 2015
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Shoov keeps evolving, and now has an example repo that demonstrates how we're trying to make UI regression simpler, we took some time to implement the second feature we were missing - automatic testing on the live site.

We saw a very strange situation everywhere we looked: Dev teams were writing amazing test coverage. They were going the extra mile to setup a Travis box with environment as close as possible to the live site. They tested every single feature, and added a regression test for every bug. Heck, every commit triggered a test suite that run for an hour before being carefully reviewed and merged.

And then the site goes live - and at best they might add Pingdom monitoring to check it's working. Pingdom at its simplest form sends an http request every minute to your site. If the answer is 200 - it means that all is good in the world. Which is of course wrong.

Our mission is to change this, and bring functional testing to the live site. One that is easy to setup and that integrates with your existing testing and GitHub flow.

The Drupal backend holds the CI build data, including the full log, and status

While Pingdom is wonderful and is alerting us on time whenever a site goes down, its "page is fine, move along" approach doesn't cut it for us. Here are some examples why testing on the production server is a good idea:

01 Apr 2015
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Testing UI regression is one of these things that make total sense but is rarely put into practice, for a simple reason - it's hard.

UI regression checking in action

If you read the theory about it, it seems pretty simple. Take a screenshot of a certain page in your site which will be your "baseline" image, and from now on, whenever the code changes re-run an automated test that will compare a current screenshot with the baseline image.

02 Mar 2015
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Graphics in the Terminal, for you geeking pleasure

If you're excited about this, you are most likely a developer - so here's the code.

If this data looks familiar to you, it might be because it's the same data you see via Hedley's Angular client.

02 Feb 2015
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Your team invested countless hours in development.

Your QA people can barely keep their eyes open - they have worked so hard. Your lead developer who's responsible for the deployment is almost dehydrated from so much pressure and sweat.

But it's all worth it. Your app is live. Now everybody goes to sleep, and your pampered app, is all alone, serving your data to the entire world.

You forgot one thing - to give it a phone to call home, and tell you something went wrong.

01 Feb 2015
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Here is a known fact - it's really easy to break the sites you are building. One wrong line of code, and a page is returning a 503 error.

Here is a known secret - (almost) nobody is doing QA. Since I'm not into arguing about this, I'm willing to soften it a bit to "most companies, don't do proper QA".

The reasons are pretty clear - not enough time and not enough budget. This post isn't going to be about the importance of QA - that point is clear to everybody, but rather give realistic tips and tools that will allow you to start improving the quality of your projects, and actually even save you some time and money.