Blog

14 Jul 2014
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In our last example we showed how to create node using an angular form served from Drupal itself. This time we are taking one big step further and create the node from a completely decoupled web app.
And if that's not enough for the readers excited by the idea of a decoupled Drupal, we've also added inline editing to the example!

Enjoy the live demo

If you know Form API's pains, you should be excited now
10 Jul 2014
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When we started working on a mobile web site for Casa del Lector's exhibition, we decided early on it would be a backend-free app, mainly for reasons of stability and performance:

App is faster than 96% of other websites

The data was entered by the client on a 3rd party desktop tool which exported it to XML. We used a bunch of open source tools to massage it a bit and prepare it for the App. Since the project is open sourced you can check out the actual code.

The App in action
09 Jul 2014
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  • Form API is great, but Form API is hard when you try to do fancier stuff - like wizards and other things that clients often want.
  • Angular forms are great, but Angular forms are hard too - you need to write your own custom endpoints and server side validation.

But now that RESTful integrates with Entity Validator, I would change the equation and simply say something rarely heard in the Drupal community: Forms are Fun!

This form is not Form API, it's angular!

Go ahead, try it yourself on simplyTest.me

01 Jul 2014
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Treat your custom CSS as contrib

Getting your Drupal to be pixel perfect is hard. In fact, it's probably four times faster to write the logic of a page, in comparison to the time it takes to get it's markup right. Not to talk about making it responsive.

If you've seen my presentation about The Gizra Way you noticed we take pixel perfect very seriously.

One of the tools that helps us getting the markup fast, correct and in a way that would allow us to communicate with the client is Jekyll - the static site generator. Here's the idea in a nutshell:

  • Using Jekyll we can concentrate on a clean markup
  • Using Grunt we compile the SASS, and are able to push the the HTML into Github pages - where the client can easily see and interact with the final markup
  • The CSS produced by Jekyll is treated by our Drupal application as contrib. This means we have zero custom CSS in our theme. Seriously, absolutely no custom CSS in your Drupal theme!
  • Any change to the CSS can be done only in a single place, which is Jekyll
25 Jun 2014
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Bootstrap is our go to base theme, but what happens when the grid the client asks for has different width, or more break points? Using Bootstrap-Sass creating a custom grid is possible in a manner that can be copied and adjusted from one project to another. As example for this post, and for your future reference you may follow the live demo and repository that changes Bootstrap to work with five breakpoints (tip: use Resizer for easy viewport resize).
Note that example is using Jekyll for simplicity, however the same technique can be used on Drupal.